The Indie Showcase Presents, Michael Trelissic


I met this weeks guest at a talk I was giving in Exmouth. One of the new breed of self-published authors; I’m delighted to feature him on the Showcase. Over to you Michael.


Reading through the features previously posted by authors I realise that I have a lot of work to do to catch up even by just a little.

So far on my writing journey I have published three books using the Smashwords platform. My writer profile for this site reads,

” Michael Trelissic ( my pen Name) was born in 1946; a year after the war in Europe had ended. 
Brought up in the industrial north of England by my widowed mother and beloved grandmother my childhood was a happy one. Our playgrounds were the chemical dumps and contaminated fields but my imagination transformed them into the much fabled green and pleasant lands of England.
I wrote from an early age and although my work was not of the classical literature kind I was told that it was always interesting and thought provoking, often with hidden meanings.”


My first short book was called Tales of the Titanic which contained the stories of six people with very different backgrounds who made the same fateful journey. This was a good place to start my literary journey as I learned a great deal about how to publish an e-book.


Smashwords requirements for formatting were strict but did me in good stead for publishing my novel “Heron” This was the opportunity I had always wanted, a chance to write a novel which would prove that I had it in me to complete a major work. I had the advantage of belonging to a Writers’ Group that comprised of five talented writers who encouraged and guided me through the process. Chief among them was my great friend and mentor Roger Johnson who I miss greatly since his passing.

More generally, I think it is an immense privilege for someone outside my family and circle of friends to read my work. After all, there is so much choice out there. Time is so limited and therefore precious and for someone to spend some of their time reading my work I find it very humbling. Although in a previous life I made my living working for a commercial corporation writing instructions for the workers to follow, I had never written fiction outside school, if you don’t count a few short stories as a thirteen-year-old.

Attending primary school in the fifties ( yes I am that young ) I would buy the Dandy on a Tuesday, the Beano on a Thursday and the Topper on a Friday. I would buy the comics with my bus money and then have to run home. The distance was a couple of miles but with short legs it felt like more. However, it turned out to be good training as I became the school’s 220 yards champion, 200 metres in today’s measurements. There were few concerns then for child safety as paedophiles hadn’t yet been invented and the road traffic was light.

During that most happy of times I learned to love science fiction by listening to the wireless. There was one programme in particular called Journey into Space, classic 1950s  sciencefiction, set in the far-flung future of the late 20th century.  Broadcast in 1953 when I was seven. I would devour it until I was caught listening by my gran; who thought these new type programmes were bad for me. But where there is strong will there is a way and one of my school friends would relate the stories to me almost word for word. Looking at some of the stuff that is broadcast these days it was pretty tame. Anyway, my novel Heron, written nearly sixty years later is the tangible fruit of my interest in science fiction.


My third book Fairy Tales for the Cynic, like Tales of the Titanic was another short book. I really enjoyed giving my sense of humour free reign as I rewrote some of my favourite nursery rhymes. If you are easily offended or strictly politically correct I advise you not to read it. It is available only in the Adult Section as it is definitely not suitable for children.


It was at an Authors evening that I met Richard who had read Heron and enjoyed it. I cannot tell you how much this boosted my confidence at a time when I needed it, thank you Richard. There is no need to tell you too much about my books as you can download the first thirty percent for free on the Smashwords site. I hope you enjoy.

Currently I am working on putting together a book of my poems. I have included one of these below. I wrote it for Valentine’s Day and any romantics out there are welcome to copy with my compliments and perhaps use it next year.


The Constant Valentine

In time and space we found each other, attracted through the crowds.

No grand announcement, no lavish wedding, no endless discussion and stressful preparations, just you and me through time and space.

Constant with a little adjustment here and there, now and again.

Words like trust and disappointment never used because never needed.

No constant declarations, just growing  appreciation every precious day with love unspoken and real.

But on that special day called Valentine, love is uttered and appreciation shown,

 a dinner out, a card, some flowers, but for me best of all,

 waking next day to find you there, my constant Valentine.


My thanks to this weeks guest for a great post. I hope you all enjoyed it.

While you’re here, why not have a look around the site? There are FREE things and a whole lot more, just follow the links at the top of the page.

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If you want to be featured in a future Showcase, where you can write about whatever (within reason) you want, then please let me know. Use the comment box below and I’ll get back to you.

You can catch up on previous Showcase posts by clicking HERE

Don’t miss the Saturday Rewind, next Thursdays Showcase post, and my musings every Monday.

Have a good week,

Richard.

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